As I was reading about various b’nai mitzvah practices and customs (there are lots of links out there), I took an interesting detour and learned a bit about Yemenite Torah reading traditions. I thought I would share some of what I learned this week.

At the Mechon Mamre web site, I read that “Yemenite Jews always allowed even children of five or six to take an aliyah.” And the Wikipedia article  on Yemenite Jews adds that “Children under the age of Bar Mitzvah are often given the sixth aliyah. Each verse of the Torah read in Hebrew is followed by the Aramaic translation, usually chanted by a child. Both the sixth aliyah and the Targum have a simplified melody, distinct from the general Torah melody used for the other aliyot.” So Torah reading (leining) was taught from a very young age. The article also notes that “In the Yemenite tradition each person called to the Torah scroll for an aliyah reads for himself.”

I also came across an article by Ephraim Stulberg on the division of aliyot in the weekly parashiyot. He references some research that indicates that the aliyah divisions did not become standardized until some time in the eighteenth century, and that the Yemenite community has its own division that differs in places from the division we see in most books today. I have looked for a table or listing of the Yemenite aliyah divisions, but so far have not yet found that information. Relating this to the Tikkun app that we are developing, this does bring up the need to support the user in selecting any range of verses as a reading to practice; this flexibility will allow the app to serve any user’s tradition.